Difference between revisions of "James Leach"

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James is ARC Future Fellow in Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Western Australia, and Director of Research at the Centre de Recherche et de Documentation sur l'Océanie. While a Research Fellow at King's College Cambridge, he was a central figure in several Crucible projects, investigating the theory and practice of description, with an emphasis on how material and social forms emerge from the processes of interdisciplinary collaboration. James is a social anthropologist who has conducted fieldwork in Papua New Guinea on kinship, place, myth/ritual, material culture, ownership and intellectual property. His subsequent fieldwork in the UK has focused on issues of creativity, knowledge production, and ownership in arts/science collaborations.
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James is ARC Future Fellow in Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Western Australia, and Director of Research at the Centre de Recherche et de Documentation sur l'Océanie. While a Research Fellow at King's College Cambridge, he was a central figure in several Crucible projects, investigating the theory and practice of description, with an emphasis on how material and social forms emerge from the processes of interdisciplinary collaboration. James is a social anthropologist who has conducted fieldwork in Papua New Guinea on kinship, place, myth/ritual, material culture, ownership and intellectual property. His subsequent fieldwork at Aberdeen and then internationally has focused on issues of creativity, knowledge production, and ownership in arts/science collaborations.
  
 
Crucible projects:
 
Crucible projects:

Revision as of 07:23, 8 August 2014

James is ARC Future Fellow in Anthropology and Sociology at the University of Western Australia, and Director of Research at the Centre de Recherche et de Documentation sur l'Océanie. While a Research Fellow at King's College Cambridge, he was a central figure in several Crucible projects, investigating the theory and practice of description, with an emphasis on how material and social forms emerge from the processes of interdisciplinary collaboration. James is a social anthropologist who has conducted fieldwork in Papua New Guinea on kinship, place, myth/ritual, material culture, ownership and intellectual property. His subsequent fieldwork at Aberdeen and then internationally has focused on issues of creativity, knowledge production, and ownership in arts/science collaborations.

Crucible projects: