Crucible Network Research Projects

Difference between revisions of "Psychology of Programming (Alan Blackwell's research theme)"

From Crucible Network Research Projects

Jump to: navigation, search
(Created page with "Wiki page summarising research by Alan Blackwell with students and collaborators Recent publications on this topic can be found at: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~afb21/publicatio...")
 
 
(4 intermediate revisions by one user not shown)
Line 4: Line 4:
 
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~afb21/publications/index.html?showonly=ppig
 
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~afb21/publications/index.html?showonly=ppig
  
Our overall strategy has been to develop 3D sketching methods, carry out iterative prototyping with experimental and field evaluations, and analyse the information structures by treating tangible interfaces and bodies as 'solid diagrams', allowing perspectives from notation design and cognitive dimensions.
+
Programming languages are the user interface between software developers and computers. Unfortunately, far more research has been dedicated to understanding the computer side of the interface (compilers, optimisers and so on) than to the human side. The field of psychology of programming aims to correct that imbalance. My own research in this field is carried out within an international community of researchers called the Psychology of Programming Interest Group (PPIG).
 +
 
 +
http://www.ppig.org
 +
 
 +
Further introductory information about the field is taught on my Masters-level course on Usability of Programming Languages.
 +
 
 +
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/teaching/1011/R201/
  
 
Sponsors:
 
Sponsors:
  
Kodak, EPSRC
+
[[Kodak]], [[EPSRC]]
  
 
Research staff and students:
 
Research staff and students:
* Luke Church
+
* [[Luke Church]]
* Hanna Wallach
+
* [[Hanna Wallach]]
* Cecily Morrison
+
* [[Cecily Morrison]]
* Kerry Rodden
+
* [[Kerry Rodden]]
 +
* [[Rob Hague]]
 +
 
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Themes]]

Latest revision as of 07:00, 1 September 2011

Wiki page summarising research by Alan Blackwell with students and collaborators

Recent publications on this topic can be found at: http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~afb21/publications/index.html?showonly=ppig

Programming languages are the user interface between software developers and computers. Unfortunately, far more research has been dedicated to understanding the computer side of the interface (compilers, optimisers and so on) than to the human side. The field of psychology of programming aims to correct that imbalance. My own research in this field is carried out within an international community of researchers called the Psychology of Programming Interest Group (PPIG).

http://www.ppig.org

Further introductory information about the field is taught on my Masters-level course on Usability of Programming Languages.

http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/teaching/1011/R201/

Sponsors:

Kodak, EPSRC

Research staff and students: